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Why She Can’t Achieve Orgasm During Sexual Intercourse

Why She Can’t Achieve Orgasm During Sexual Intercourse

In fact an orgasm is a peak feeling of intense pleasure in response to stimulating sexual activity.

Vaginal penetration during sex indirectly stimulates the clitoris. But this may not be enough stimulation for orgasm.

Several women may also need direct manual or oral stimulation of the clitoris to reach orgasm.>>>>>CONTINUE READING HERE>>>>>

Anorgasmia, or female orgasmic disorder, is defined as experiencing any of the effects listed below in a significant way:

1.Delayed orgasm

2. Absence of orgasm

3. Fewer orgasms

4. Less-intense orgasms

Anorgasmia can also be: Lifelong, if you have never had an orgasm

Acquired, if you have new problems with having orgasms

Situational, if you have problems with orgasm only in certain situations, with certain kinds of stimulation or with certain partners

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Generalized, if you have problems with orgasm in any situation

Women who don’t always reach orgasm during sexual encounters may not find it distressing.

In that case, the lack of an orgasm is not considered a disorder.

Causes

Sexual arousal and orgasms are complex reactions to various physical, emotional, sensory and psychological factors.

Difficulties in any of these areas can affect your ability to have an orgasm.

Personal and psychological factors
Past experiences, behaviors, background or mental well-being may contribute to problems with orgasms.

These include:

1. Past sexual or emotional abuse

2. Lack of knowledge about sexual stimulation or interactions

3. Poor body image

4. Guilt or embarrassment about sex

5. Cultural or religious beliefs about sex

6. Stressors, such as financial problems or loss of a loved one

7. Mental health conditions, such as anxiety or depression

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8. Relationship factors

9. Problems with your sex partner may be contributing factors to problems with orgasms.

These may include:

Lack of emotional intimacy
Unresolved conflicts
Poor communication of sexual needs and preferences
Infidelity or breach of trust
Intimate partner violence
Partner’s sexual dysfunction, such a male partner with erectile dysfunction
Physical causes

A wide range of illnesses, physical changes and medications can interfere with orgasms:

Health conditions. Long-term conditions — such as diabetes, overactive bladder or multiple sclerosis — may be contributing or complicating factors in orgasm disorders.
Gynecological treatments.

Tissue damage from gynecologic surgeries, such as hysterectomy or cancer surgery, may affect the ability to have an orgasm.
Medications.

Many prescription and nonprescription medications can inhibit orgasm, including blood pressure medications, antipsychotic drugs, antihistamines and antidepressants — particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

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Alcohol and smoking.

Alcohol suppresses the nervous system and may hamper the ability to have an orgasm.

Smoking can limit blood flow to your sexual organs, affecting your ability to have an orgasm.

Age-related changes to the body.

Changes to the body after menopause or later in life may contribute to various types of sexual dysfunction.

Related sexual disorders

Women experiencing anorgasmia may have one or more related sexual problems.

These may contribute to or complicate the problem with having orgasms.

These conditions include:

Problems with sexual arousal
Little or no desire for sex
Pain from sexual intercourse or other sexual stimulation
Dryness of the vagina or vulva
Involuntary tightening of the vagina (vaginismus).

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